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happened next? >>> also in dagestan, the parents of the suspects were interviewed by officials at the u.s. embassy, and the father reportedly will be flying to the u.s. as early as friday. possibly to assist in the investigation. at the same time, we're learning more about the older brother's trip back home. cnn's nick paton walsh is in dagestan. and thousands attended the service of sean collier. and tonight some extraordinary scenes, incredible and deeply emotional sight, just a few feet from the marathon finishing line. a memorial to the victims, people leaving flowers and cards, stopping to pay tribute to the lives so brutally taken and so many who were so badly wounded. but we're covering this story around the world tonight with nick paton walsh in dagestan. jake, i want to start with you. a day of increasing revelation, really, about a collective board dropping by the cia. >> reporter: that's right. cnn learned not only the fsb, the russian equivalent -- the successor to the kgb, not only did the russian fsb reach out to the fbi in 2011 and ask them to keep an eye on tamerlan tsar
to dagestan and chechnya. i want to bring in pete williams. good morning once again. i want to start with dzhokhar tsarnaev. do we know specifically beyond serious condition how he's doing and how much talking he's doing? >> well, very little talking because of his throat wound. serious but stable condition is the way they describe it. we have been told that they are asking him some questions during brief periods and that he is giving them answers in writing. what he's saying we don't know. we can assume they are asking him about other threats. whether they had other plotters working with them or whether there were other explosives out there. that's the kind of questions they can ask during this initial period before they have to give him a miranda warning. >> which deals with public security threat. do investigators have a good handle, pete, on how big an arsenal they had? >> you know, we have heard conflicting things about this. we know they had a lot of finished bombs because they threw a lot of them out of the car as the police were chasing them thursday night, friday morning. th
visited his father in dagestan? did that trip have anything to do with the bombing or his radicalization? as for the boston marathon bombing itself, those who have seen a still unreleased surveillance video acquired by the fbi say it shows dzhokhar tsarnaev removing his backpack at the spot where the second bomb was placed and acting very differently from those around him when the first bomb went off. >> it does seem to be pretty clear that this suspect took the backpack off, put it down, did not react when the first explosion went off and then moved away from the backpack in time for the second explosion. so pretty clear about his involvement and pretty chilling, frankly, as it was described to me. >> and this one other note -- police say that the brothers carjacked an suv thursday night and held the car's owner at gunpoint. he tells nbc news tonight that he escaped when they stopped at a gas station. he described them as "brutal and cautious." he asked that we not identify him, and he declined an on-camera interview, lester. >> pete, it is our understanding criminal charges are being p
between the caspian and black seas that includes the russian republic of dagestan. after this agreement was reached, russian intelligence then asked the fbi to investigate tamerlan tsarnaev, the elder of two brothers charged with carrying out the boston marathon bombings that killed three people. two americans and a chinese national and wounded 260 on april the 15th. tamerlan was age 26 when he was shot and killed four days after the marathon by police in watertown, massachusetts, where he and his brother dzhokhar, age 19, had sought refuge. okay. back to russia's request in 2011. the fbi fulfilled the russian request and interviewed tamerlan and found nothing suspicious. but the russians were not satisfied with the fbi nothing suspicious report so the russians then asked the cia to look into tamerlan's background, especially any links to radical islam. so the cia added tamerlan's name to its terrorist database. tamerlan's parents watched all of this from dagestan, the russian republic, where they were interviewed late this week over there by the fbi. the fbi's findings. 15 months ago,
from dagestan to the united states as far as what criminal activity is taking place in our own country. if dagestan is a place where it is known that as a haven for jihadist philosophy, why we would not be concerned about someone and the united states going to that area for six months. what was he doing for six months? who would this person, the older brother, who could he have been meeting with to get an influence on al qaeda or from al qaeda jihadist movements? >> i just want to suggest that one of the insights americans have brought to the appearance of terrorism is that it is often bred and failed states where there are no political institutions to run things. a week ago, the new acting president of dagestan, described his republic as a failed state where political and legal institutions did not work and where he cannot control the situation. failed states that cannot control their population or operate as a state now -- normally does, open areas exploited by radicals of various kinds. there are places in dagestan were officials have not been. so the possibility of someone going th
plotnikov dies in a firefight with russian forces in dagestan last july. plotnikov was born in russia, but his family moved to canada when he was a teenager. nick paton walsh joining us live from moscow. nick, explain who this guy william plotnikov was and the possible links, possible links, to tamerlan tsarnaev. >> reporter: well, investigators are looking to see if there's link because of the sheer parallel between william plotnikov, a north american canadian box somewhere tam tsarnaev, also born in former soviet union, moving to north america, and a keen boxer as well. they were both, it seems, in dagestan at the same time. most importantly, the key link seems to be tamerlan tsarnaev left russia just a couple of days after the death of william plotnikov in an ambush by russian special forces. as you say, there's no key evidence suggesting there was a link or contact between them. the parallels are just there. and they're glaring. that's why investigators are looking at it, wolf. >> as you know, the russians alerted the u.s. about tamerlan tsarnaev back, what, 2011. earlier today pr
and a young boxer, canadian turned jihadi. he and six others killed in the dagestan region in july 2012, exactly the same time that tamerlan tsarnaev was in the very same region. his body was prepared for burial by an imam july 14th. they believe it was brought down from the mountains and prepared for burial. a few days later, tamerlan left dagestan and went to moscow where he caught a plane to the united states. the time line of this is that tamerlan was actually waiting for his russian passport to arrive. he had applied at an office in dagestan, waiting for the document, the russian passport to arrive and he left without it. and that's what makes it so curious. when he flew into new york, he did have a passport and his permanent resident card. two documents that he would have to enter the united states. it's curious as to why he would have left that region without his new passport. that's why they're looking at this closely. erin? >> especially if that was extensively the reason why he was going. deborah, investigators are looking for a link between tamerlan and another militant. did
in the capital of dagestan in russia where tamerlan's father currently lives, and where tamerlan spent at least six months last year. cnn cannot confirm that tamerlan and the man actually met in dagestan. the video, though, has been deleted from tamerlan's youtube account, but was tracked down by cnn. these are important developments we're trying to learn as much about both of these suspects as we possibly can. let's go live to dagestan right now. nick walsh is in the town there. it's near chechnya. you heard from a rebel chechen group in the area about the two bombing suspects, one dead, the older brother. the other very much alive at a hospital here in boston. what is this chechen rebel group saying? >> well, the chechen rebel group said they had nothing to do with it. this is the emirate of the caucuses brotherhood that links many of the areas. let me talk you through what we know about the link between tamerlan tsarnaev and the militant here who died in a very heavy firefight with russian special forces not far at all from where i'm standing last december. and tamerlan tsarnaev had a youtub
-torn regions of chechnya and dagestan. the younger brother became a u.s. citizen on september 11th of last year, and tamerlan followed and got a green card. dzhokhar won a scholarship before enrolling at the university of massachusetts. and people we spoke to said they never saw any signs of trouble. >> regular teenager. did not suspect anything. he was on the wrestling team. went to parties with other students. yeah. he went to the prom. >> he was a wonderful kid. we were proud of him. he was an outstanding athlete. he was -- there is nothing -- you know, he was never a troublemaker in the school. >> interviewed on friday, their father insisted his sons are innocent. >> translator: somebody framed them, and i don't know who did it but somebody did, and being cowards they shot the boy did, and there are cops like this. >> but the uncle in maryland said the boys were, quote, losers. >> being losers, and hatred to those that were able to settle themselves. i cannot imagine anything else, anything else but religion with islam. it's a fraud. >> meanwhile back in boston, the city is relieved the nig
who moves from dagestan-- and i can't begin to tell you how different life is, dagestan is from life in cambridge, ma dagestan is the where the spillover from the two chechen wars is being felt to this day. it's a very, very violent place. it's a place where the russian army and government is the putting immense pressure on separatists and fundamentalists. there's a real cruel war taking place between a cruel government in moscow and very unzaire savory characters in dagestan and chechnya. this is no longer a matter of romantic nationalism, it's much more a matter of jihadi activity. so what the tsarnaev brothers started to focus in on wasn't just a matter -- >> rose: brothers or one? >> well, i think -- again, the picture seems to be that the younger brother follows the older brother. but the younger brother also is expressing these views on his twitter feed in so far as we can say. these are ideas that 140 characters at shot. sglaefrjtdz s they're starting to look at videos of deeply unsavory religious preachers. there's one named fez mohammed who's australian born who's based in s
. and when he comes back from dagestan and he goes on the internet, youtube and other public outlets and starts talking in a radical fashion and we can't pick that up in light of all the warnings we've had, i know that's fair. >> tonight we bring jake tapper in from boston and nick payton-walsh in dagestan. jake, pretty disturbing development today about the new york connection with these two boston marathon bombers. >> reporter: that's right. we've heard from both mayor bloomberg and the police commissioner in new york, ray kelly, that the thinking is from both what the bombers said when they carjacked the car, thankfully the man whose car it was escaped unscathed, and also from subsequent interviews with dzhokhar tsarnaev in his hospital bed, that the plan was after leaving boston, the brothers, the suspected terrorists, would head to new york city and try to explode this considerable explosives they had upon them in times square. that's the latest information, and as you say, it's quite alarming. >> also, we have this development that you had an interview with a cab driver in bost
. >> thiss man is going to dagestan. >> for people who don't know about dagestan, people talk about chechnya being violent. dagestan is a very violent place. >> chechnya was violent in the early part of the century. i was in moscow two days after the killings when all the young people were killed. >> hideous. >> i was told by the russian authorities then, including the foreign minister, he was impressing on me how much more dangerous the chechens are than even the other islamic extremist terrorists and how we, america, should take them more seriously. what's happened in dagestan is russia crushed the revolt in chechnya. it's moved to dagestan. these people are extraordinarily vicious killers. kill children, kill innocent people, blew up a theater. you're dealing with extremely dangerous people. when you get information from the russians that this man may be connected to something like that -- >> that is unusual for the russians to do this. >> it is. i know they're saying when we get information, we get information, it is unusual to get that kind of information, particularly about -- particul
are in dagestan, that may be where tamerlan tsarnaev went and got the training and the practice to use these bombs. so understandable that perhaps they're a little more circumspect now. what is not understandable is why the fbi appear to have had separate warnings about both tamerlan and the mother, and also the cia had a warning about tamerlan. there's been no collective assessment of this character that would imply he may be the danger that he turned out to be. >> reporter: there's a great suspicion between both sides, the russians and the americans, dating back to the cold war in many ways. the americans don't buy the russian argument that chechen militants here are any way involved in international terrorism. i think the issue you've also got to face is a real sense of they say, from the russians in this particular area. i should point out also, we spoke to the mother today. she was extraordinarily distraught and appears to be grasping at any possible theory she can find that means she doesn't have to accept what u.s. officials are saying her sons are guilty of. let's hear what she had to say.
was shocked by her husband and brother-in-law's actions. >>> in dagestan, the boys' mother, still in denial. >> i am mother. i have -- you know, i know my kids. i know my kids. i really my kids would never get involved into anything like that. >> in the boston area, local police are now taking a closer look into a possible link between older brother, tamerlan tsarnaev, and a 2011 unsolved triple homicide. >>> and local police are also taking a look at what links there may have been. in canada, two men charged with plotting to blow up a passenger train between toronto and new york make their first appearances in court while on capitol hill senator charles grassley keeps raising the boston plot as he opposes the timetable for immigration reform. >> the tragic events that occurred in boston and the potential terrorist attacks of the u.s. canadian railroad are reminders that our immigration system is directly related to our sovereignty and national security matters. >>> and guess who is coming to dinner? the president hosts the women of the senate, senator kirsten gillenbrand is here to preview
killed in the raid in dagestan. meanwhile, the bombing suspect dzhokhar tsarnaev is now locked inside a 10 x 10 foot cell with a steel door, a slot for food and a small observation window in that door. a prison spokesman says the 19-year-old is now able to speak and has been interacting with medical staff. and a memorial for the victims continues to grow in boston's copley square. thousands of people are going there to pay their respects. we have reporters on the scene bringing us all the latest developments. investigators right now are searching for any clues that will help them determine whether the boston bombings suspect tamerlan tsarnaev had tied to jih jihadist. and that overnight raid in russia is raising even more questions. for more on how the group may be linked to the boston terror suspect, let's bring in cnn's nick paton walsh on the scene for us in moscow. nick, what's the possible connection that authorities are investigating? >> well, the raid you've just been seeing pictures of took place very early yesterday morning in a village in dagestan. it killed a man with relev
contacts and what happened on that trip to russia. >> it was six months in dagestan. also perhaps a visit to chechnya. >> you're hearing the russians saying, hey, we told you so. were they profiling him in russia? and if not, why not. how many people did the russians ask for us to look out? if it was thousands, then he was no different than any other. those are the questions for the investigation. of course the u.s. attorney is preparing a case. it is going to go through a normal article three court. the big question i think is going to be is there going to be a change of venue given what this city has gone through. can you find -- once we get to that point, can you find an objective jury? >> did they do practice runs not only the scene, but did that explode devices previously? there were some reports of local unexplained explosions in various areas around here, but it is not clear whether or not they tested these devices. >> right. we think it is ov-- there is ren in the city. the turnpike is open. that's important for people's sense of civility. people will -- the fbi will work with cit
are that there was a family member who may have radicalized tamerlan during his six months in russia and dagestan. some suggestions that it was his mother. others that she was not herself radicalized in her religious impact. do you know what the fbi now believes about that? >> they don't have an opinion about this. and this is one of those parts, you know, when you cover an investigation like this, there are parts of the investigation where needless to say the investigators are ahead of the reporting, we're always trying to catch up. and there are other parts of it where the reporters are ahead of the investigators, this is one phase. because the fbi is taking steps to get people into dagestan and talk to the family members. but they have to go through all sorts of procedures, they have no legal standing to question people on their own. without the permission from authorities. that takes time to work out. whereas a journalist can just go up and knock on the door. so this is a part that they'll catch up with. for now i guess you could say the reporters are out ahead. >> one final thing, pete. with your
in chechnya or rather dagestan last summer. there is some question about whether or not that had anything to do with tamerlan's decision to leave dagestan last summer. so a lot of leads that are being pursued at this hour, piers. >> also, we've got this video which is the first time we've actually heard dzhokhar tsarnaev talking. it's a fairly harmless video of him with his niece. but interesting that his accent, his voice, is pretty americanized. >> reporter: yeah. he came here at a young age. we interviewed somebody who lived in the same building as tamerlan and dzhokhar, and talked about somebody that he knew who was a tutor for dzhokhar when he was young, when he was in i think third grade, teaching him english. so he has been in this country for a long time. >> we'll take another look at that, actually. for those who haven't seen it, this is the video of dzhokhar tsarnaev talking for the first time that we have discovered so far. listen to this. >> you burped in my face. >> i burped. >> get out. >> no go. >> get out of my room. >> no room get out. >> i said get out. >> no get out. >>
authorities two years ago intercepted a call from one of the brothers back to their mother in dagestan, a vague conversation apparently about jihad. the younger suspect, now in a ten by ten foot cell outside boston, has a new lawyer on his defense team specializing in death penalty cases. her name is judy clark. she once defended jared loughner, the tucson shooter. joe johns joins me tonight along with nick payton walsh. this female dna found on one of the pressure cookers, what more can you tell us? what might it mean? >> there's no way to tell at this point, quite frankly. what could it mean, we don't know. one law enforcement source said the dna could belong to anyone who came in contact with any of the consumer products that were used to make the bomb. just the same, they want to see if they can track it down and of course, they started with the wife of the widow of tamerlan tsarnaev. >> so joe, you can't assume that it was somebody who helped make the bomb. it could be the hair of a salesperson who sold one of the components, you're saying? >> that's right. it may well not implica
. she also says they've left their home in dagestan and gone to another part of russia. 34 of the more than 260 people wounded in last week east's ter attacks are still in the hospital. one remains in critical condition. at least 14 of the bombing victims have had to have amputations. a lot to tell you about in the hour ahead. he spent almost a week in the same hospital as some of the victims he's accused of wounding, but now dzhokhar tsarnaev is in that medical center. deborah feyerick is live outside the medical center in massachusetts and elizabeth cohen is with us from cnn headquarters in atlanta. debra, fill us in on the nuts and bolts of the transfer? >> we can tell you we got an e-mail about 6:00 -- just a few minutes after 6:00 this morning saying in fact the u.s. marshals had transported dzhokhar tsarnaev to the medical facility here which you see behind me. this is the devans federal medical center. there is a high security area plus we understand a team of doctors. this is done in close coordination with both the u.s. attorney's office, the fbi as well as the doctors that ar
their reaction. nick paton walsh is joining us from southern russia, he's in dagestan. nick, you spoke with the suspect's aunt. what did she say? >> reporter: a number of interesting things. firstly, that when he came back last year to dagestan, tamerlan tsarnaev, the older brother, he went tries to chechnya to visit relatives. but she was struck by how he had embraced devoutly the islamic faith. here's what she had to say. is there a connection between this gun fight and one of the boston bombers? the youtube page suggests there might be. he put up a link to a video he put up a link to a video and it was removed, but cnn has now found it and it shows this man. it's an islamist militant. russian special forces hit his hideout last december to kill as many as six militants inside. the grisly aftermath showing heavy weapons, but also the heavy hand used to kill them. four months later, the marks remain of the tit for tat violence fueling militancy across the region. neighbors told us the young man who once lived here seamed peaceful, ordinary, but in the dust lies a question why did tsar
states. nic robertson is in the news conference in dagestan. he will join us live in a few minutes with more. meantime, here's the latest in the investigation. a congressman who sits tons house intelligence committee rae vealing the tsarnaev brothers used a remote control device similar to one used to operate a toy car to set huh the explosives. in the next 24 hours the father of the suspected bombers anzor tsarnaev is expected to arrive in the united states. we are told he is cooperating with the fbi investigation. and we've also learned that the russian not t only flagged the fbi about tamerlan tsarnaev, they also sent a warning letter to the cia after the fbi checked him out. both agencies determined there was not enough specific information to move on. so, with the new information about the use of remote controls, investigators are focusing on how these bombs were made. they want to know if the tsarnaev brothers got any helper happens from any militant inside dagestan. cnn's miguel marquez has the latest on this angle from the streets of boston. good morning, miguel. >> reporte
paton walsh is in dagestan, and we have joe johns in washington, but we began with pamela brown with the latest on the investigation. >>> after a week of terror, chaos and heartache, the city of boston is still recovering. there are signs that life is starting to return back to normal here. there is a sense of relief after the arrest of the suspect, 19-year-old dzhokhar tsarnaev. now the focus is on what charges he will face and when. >> reporter: one week after two deadly bombings exploded in downtown boston killing three and injuring 183 people, the only surviving suspect remains in serious condition. as federal prosecutors prepare to bring charges against him, law enforcement sources say dzhokhar tsarnaev is unable to talk after a gunshot wound to the neck. exactly when he suffered this injury is still unknown. >> this is a complex investigation. and it's hard to say exactly how he received that injury. there was a shootout in watertown. there were explosives thrown. so that's being looked into right now. it's hard to say how it owe kurd. >> reporter: we're learning more abou
year to the dagestan and chechnya regions of russia is attract-- attracting increase add tension tonight. charlie what more do we know this evening about the time he spent in these regions? >> well, jeff, neighbors that we spoke to in dagestan over the phone today said that tamerlan stayed with his father or his relatives pretty of the whole time he was there for six or seven months and he helped his father renovate their family business in that area. they also spoke to people at the local mosque who said that he attended regularly but there was nothing to suggest anything sinister or anything suspect about his activities there. importantly today the local chechen rebel commander in dagestan said that there was never any direct contact-- contact with tamerlan and certainly they had nothing to do with the attacks in boston. >> jeff: charlie what is the russian government saying about all this? >> well, jeff, the russian government sd tha ty e assisting the united states investigators anyway that they can. but there are a lot of questions being asked about russian security services
ofarnaev returned to dagestan where he spent some of hisage yd it was a happy reunion but there were some differences, , cording to his aunt. he'd quit drinking, grown a beard and found religion. "he was no fanatic, he was curious," she said. "we would talk about his commitment to religion but it wasn't extreme." members of a mosque in dagestan e ld us tamerlan attended friday prayers but there was nothing unusual about his behavior. one neighbor told us tamerlan spent most of his visit helping ts father to renovate his shop. what he did with the rest of time is not known. dagestan, which borders chechnya, is the center of a violent islamic insurgency fighting for independence from russia. in 2010, islamic militants from the region bombed the moscow subway system during rush hour, killing 38 and wounding more than 60. while there's no evidence that thmerlan joined these militant groups, the violence would have been impossible to ignore.ys anysmaria lipman has studied chechnya since the '90s. >> you hang around. you hang around with people your age. with probably young men. and i think it
reporting on that. we also have reporting as well on a jihadist in russia's dagestan region whose video was on tamerlan's youtube channel. a guy who met with foreigners during the time that tamerlan was in the region and say local police helped train them in bomb-making. significance of it we're looking into. we also know that secretary of state kerry suspects an overseas connection. listen. >> we just had a young person who went to russia and chechnya who blew people up in boston. so he didn't stay where he went, but he learned something where he went and came back with a willingness to kill people. >> there is also the shadowy figure known as mischa, russian name for michael who may help rat radicalize the older brother. and the parents will be flying to boston tomorrow and that the fbi has interviewed them and others already back in russia. now, the mother who left the country several years ago with a shoplifting charge hanging over her. so unclear how that might figure into her traveling back here. will she actually be arrested and face charges here? we don't know. we are learning
snow in times square in new york. mary, nick payton-walsh is also in russia, in dagestan, former massachusetts homeland security advisor juliette kayyem is currently a boston globe columnist. on the phone, joining us is former homeland security advisor fran townsend, who currently sits on the homeland security and cia external advisory panels. appreciate all of you being with us. mary, mayor bloomberg isn't the only one saying that manhattan was a target for the brothers. who else? >> reporter: correct. ray kelly, the police commissioner, as you mentioned, both these new york city officials were briefed by the fbi about this, and with the information they were given, anderson, they say they were told that there was talk about targeting times square and the way the police commissioner described these discussions, he said that these were spontaneous discussions that came about apparently from the information that the fbi relayed to them is that the brothers had talked about this after they were said to have hijacked that mercedes suv. you know, it's a very different account than wh
as the suspected radicalization with former cia officer bob baer, nick payton walsh in the dagestan region of russia. there has been a big crackdown on alleged muslim extremists in russia today by russian authorities. did this have any connection, as far as we know, to this ongoing investigation? >> they've not said that it does and there is no reason to believe there is cak, but large numbers arrested in an area outside of moscow, not one we've seen in the spotlight in the past in terms of statements from russian security services, but this large number surely will make people think of two possible reasons for this. perhaps they had been looking to go for this organization for some period of time and want the international political cover of what just happened in boston and the suggestion of a connection here, or maybe this is an attempt to try to preempt criticism they're not doing enough to stamp down on hardcore islamic groups here. as i say, no real specifics as to why they made these arrests but my long time working in russia, i really haven't seen such large numbers in one single sw
traveling to a remote region of russia called dagestan, looking for clues about the backgrounds of the two brothers suspected in these attacks. >> one small town in russia where i spoke to their father yesterday. >>> also, we examine the role of social media during this drama. how it helped solve the case. and how it helped manage a city keep on lockdown for an entire day. >> the role of technology fascinating in this ongoing story. >>>let get right, though, to what we're learning this morning. new details about how the manhunt finally ended with the second suspect found bloody in a boat in a backyard in watertown, massachusetts, right outside boston. abc's chief investigative correspondent brian ross is in boston this morning. outside the hospital where the suspect is right now. brian, good morning. >> reporter: good morning, dan. he's reported to be in serious but stable condition. he was brought here last night. capping a remarkable 24-hour period that began when the fbi first released surveillance footage of two unidentified men. within the course of two hours, they had been identified
tsarnaev spent about six months in russia mainly in dagestan where his father is. we know extremists are involved in quite violent attacks against police and civilian targets. what can we read into what he may have experienced in dagestan? >> yeah, this is absolutely key, piers. while it is true that chechen insurgency ended, the violence move need dagestan and it is a place of great unrest. it is a mountainous society. it is muslim and the experience he had there would have absolutely drummed home for him the suffering of the chechen people as he would have received through family stories. we could put a face on it. there were terror attacks during the time he was there. whether he was glorying in those things or whether he he was making connections to actually islamist insurgence and learning skills, that we don't know but we know that psychologically these things were becoming normal for him. these things were becoming day-to-day occurrences because of where he was living. >> his brother dzhokhar is cl m claiming to the fbi that his brother coerced him into doing it. something yo
of the chechens. dagestan has a serious problem. she's from dagestan, he's from chechnya. i can buy the fact that they ended up here, they got their status. that part doesn't bother me. you know, what bothers me is the hypocrisy of people who want to act like action jackson and say why weren't we on these people, monitoring this guy? if they step back and quit with the histrionics and look at what they're allowed to do, they'll see that's what they did. >>> i'm puzzled as to the action characters you could have pulled from. you chose carl weathers, an interesting choice. >> i like him too. >> i think we've beat this into the ground. >> i don't think so. >> you want to keep going? >> i have one more thing. on another network which i don't mention, but it rhymes with cnn, bali, the gym, it's always cnn going on. there are pictures of the older brother boxing. i don't know if you've seen the pictures. he's always relaxed, shirtless like this. i'm thinking to myself, isn't this what they want? like if you know you're going to die and whether it's -- this is actually better than 72 virgins. immor
, then to dagestan. >> dagestan is important to note, has turned into the epicenter of the radical jihadi movement in the caucasus because the russians have been so effective in pushing the insurgency out of chechnya itself. >> the family finally emigrated to the united states. tamerlan's uncle says it's in the u.s. that his nephew fell under the influence of a new convert to islam. >> i said, this person took advantage. brain washed him. >> much of the focus now is on his six-month stay last year in dagestan and chechnya. once back in the united states, tamerlan created a youtube channel, posting a video of abu dujana, a self-styled jihadi leader from dagestan. it's not clear whether he actually met dujana in the caucasus emirate, which the united states says is a terrorist organization, this weekend denied any connection to the boston bombings. what tamerlan did in dagestan and chechnya still isn't known. but his aunt says he had undergone a transformation. >> they hadn't prayed before they went to america. nobody caught him. he learned everything himself. >> that raises some other questions. wa
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